Sacrosidase Trial in Chronic Nonspecific Diarrhea in Children



Riad M. Rahhal*, Warren P. Bishop
University of Iowa Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, 200 Hawkins Dr, 2868 JPP, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA.


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© 2008 Rahhal and Bishop

open-access license: This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International Public License (CC-BY 4.0), a copy of which is available at: https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/legalcode. This license permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original author and source are credited.

* Address correspondence to this author at the University of Iowa Children's Hospital, Department of Pediatrics, Division of Gastroenterology, 200 Hawkins Dr, 2868 JPP, Iowa City, Iowa 52242, USA; Tel: 319 356 2950; Fax: 319 353 8967; E-mail: riad-rahhal@uiowa.edu


Abstract

Chronic nonspecific diarrhea in children, or toddler’s diarrhea, is a frequently encountered entity in pediatric clinical practice. This disorder remains poorly understood. Suggested etiologies include malabsorption, dietary intake and motility abnormalities. We investigated the use of sacrosidase (a yeast sucrase supplement) in children with toddler’s diarrhea. The study outcome was clinical response to sacrosidase supplementation. Children, 1-6 years of age, with toddler’s diarrhea were enrolled in an open prospective trial. Stooling patterns were obtained at baseline and while on supplementation. Twelve patients were enrolled out of 40 patients who presented with chronic diarrhea. Eight patients did not respond to standard diet changes and were entered into the trial. With supplementation, 4 out of the 8 patients responded clinically with a decrease in mean daily stool frequency and an improvement in the mean daily stool consistency. Sacrosidase supplementation demonstrated a potential benefit in a subset of children with toddler’s diarrhea. Response to sacrosidase may suggest excessive sucrose intake or unrecognized partial or complete sucrase deficiency in some children with toddler’s diarrhea.

Keywords: Congenital sucrase-isomaltase deficiency, sacrosidase, toddler's diarrhea, chronic nonspecific diarrhea.